Life as a tournament organizer

Jordan Hay, Staff Writer

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Organizational skills are great to have. Whether they are for school, personal life or some other facet of life, one will most likely have to use organizational skills.
Organization is something that most hit or miss on. In school, it’s very common for people to have trouble with procrastination. Leaving bedrooms messy from stress, or waiting to do homework until the night before it is due, in general, it seems like life can be very unorganized
There is one place, however, where organizational skills can shine out. That place is Super Smash Brothers tournaments.
In the Super Smash Brothers competitive scene, one generally fits into one of three roles: spectator, competitor or tournament organizer.
For local and regional scenes there are many competitors and spectators and usually a few or maybe even one tournament organizer.
One may ask, “How hard could organizing a tournament be?” And an accurate response to that would be laughter and an unequivocal “very hard.”
For hosting just a simple weekly tournament, there are many people one has to talk to and things to do to make it as successful as possible.
They must first make sure you have a venue to host said tournament. In the Valley, there are places to host such events like Game Play in Clarkston that hosts tournaments for free. Finding venues for a bigger tournament is more difficult because one has to include how much the venue may cost to host the event into account.
The next step usually is to announce the tournament to the community. For the local Smash community, local Smash players have their own Facebook group, where the tournament organizer creates posts to connect to people throughout the group. The organizer uses various regional Smash Facebook groups and word of mouth when announcing tournaments.
When the tournament is scheduled and announced, organizers reach out to people in the community to help and bring their game setups. This provides a better experience for the participants and helps the tournament run more smoothly. Having more setups at a tournament usually makes the tournament a lot better. This provides people more opportunities for friendly matches later in the night.
When at the tournament, the organizer arranges the tables and chairs to their liking and set up their consoles and monitors.
Now, they wait for the other competitors to arrive. During this time, the organizers open their laptops and set up the bracket on a website called Challonge.com. With online bracket makers, this makes the job at least 1000 times easier.
The hardest parts of tournament organizing are now over and it’s time to run the bracket. People show up, give their entry fee to the organizer and then are placed in a bracket. They then seed the bracket based on previous tournament results, making the tournament fairer.